Date of Award


Document Type

Thesis - SCU Access Only


Santa Clara University

First Advisor

Unyoung Kim


In recent years, extensive research in microfluidics has led to various micro total analysis systems (mTAS) ranging from genomic sequencing and drug discovery to diagnostics, and precise, low-power control of fluid flow is critical for the successful implementation of such systems. While the most common way to drive microfluidic flow is via syringe pumps attached to capillary tubing and fluidic interconnects onto a chip, these pumps are quite bulky, expensive, and not ideal for miniaturization and integration with other microfluidic components. To overcome these limitations, we and others have developed small-scale microfluidic pumps based on electrolysis to replace macro-scale mechanical pumps. Here, we propose further development of our work, an electrolytic micropump integrating a pump, check valves, and chambers within a single layered platform, which allows facile integration with other microfluidic systems. Our micropump utilizes planar check valves, and combines electrolytic bubble growth and catalyst-driven recombination of electrolysis gases to cyclically dispense fluids.