Title

Hobbes, Revolution, and the Philosophy of History

Document Type

Book Chapter

Publication Date

1987

Publisher

Springer

Abstract

When coming to the study of Hobbes’s political philosophy one is confronted by several puzzling elements. I wish to take up three of them. The most bothersome, perhaps, is Hobbes’s claim that there is no significant difference between sovereignty by institution and sovereignty by acquisition. Both can be legitimate and can be so for the same reason, namely, the consent of the subjects.

Chapter of

Hobbes's 'Science of Natural Justice.'

Part of

Archives Internationales D’histoire des Idées/International Archives of the History of Ideas

Editor

Craig Walton
Paul J. Johnson